flooded treelined street
Project

Flood-Prepared Communities

Floods and hurricanes can threaten human lives and cause significant economic and physical damage to communities, including homes, businesses, and infrastructure. Since 2000, flood-related disasters in the U.S. accounted for more than $845 billion in losses, making it the costliest disaster threat in the nation.

Pew aims to reduce these impacts through policies that will modernize federal flood insurance, mitigate disasters, prioritize investments in flood-ready infrastructure, and promote nature-based solutions.

Getty Images
Getty Images
Article

New Bill Aims to Make Communities More Flood-Ready

Quick View
Article

The 2020 hurricane season continues to produce tropical systems at a record rate. With nine named storms having made U.S. landfall just halfway through the season, flood risk is a major concern for many vulnerable communities. To help reduce the impacts of these types of events in the future, legislation was introduced today in Congress that would make communities and infrastructure more resilient to flooding.

Flooded street
Flooded street
Article

Maryland Flood Risk Leads to Buyouts

Quick View
Article

As the state hazard mitigation officer for the Maryland Emergency Management Agency (MEMA), JaLeesa Tate develops policies and strategies to address threats from natural disasters.

overview
overview
Article

Mitigation Matters: Policy Solutions to Reduce Local Flood Risk

Quick View
Article

Since 2000, floods have cost the United States more than $845 billion in damage to homes, businesses, and critical infrastructure. The expense of adapting to more frequent and severe storms is projected to rise over the next several decades, placing a premium on the need to take action now to reduce the impacts of future floods.

Our Work

Floods
Floods

Modern, Flood-Ready Approach Needed for Building and Rebuilding

Quick View

The most common and expensive natural disasters in the United States involve flooding, costing an estimated $768 billion in losses since 2000, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Last year, the devastation caused by inland flooding and powerful hurricanes was compounded by aging infrastructure that suffers from years of neglect.

It's Time to Make U.S. Infrastructure Flood-Ready